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Product

A good product causes students (individually and in groups) to rethink what they have learned, apply what they can do, extend their understanding and skill, and become involved in both critical and creative thinking. Tomlinson & Allan

 

 

The product refers to the ways students can demonstrate what they have come to know, understand and be able to do over an extended period of time, such as a term or a unit. For example, students may be asked to keep a portfolio of their work or complete an end of unit project. High quality products may supplement or replace other assessment or evaluation options such as tests.

Ways to Differentiate Product

To differentiate product you can :

  • vary the complexity and depth of the task to match student readiness
  • encourage students to demonstrate learning in a variety of ways e.g. through different modes of expression (not just written language), materials, technologies, etc.
  • include students in the development of the product
  • provide scaffolding as needed to promote success e.g. brainstorming ideas for getting started, minilessons on research strategies, peer editing and revision, storyboarding, etc.
  • make adjustments for student readiness, interests, ways of working, personal goals e.g. make digital audio or video versions of directions, break the product up into smaller increments, etc.
  • work with students to develop rubrics/criteria for success

(adapted from Tomlinson and Allan)

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Product Examples

Many of the following product ideas have been developed by teachers around the province. These projects all engage students in creative and higher-order thinking. They provide opportunities for students to work in flexible groups and to use talk to learn during the span of the project.

The projects include content, process and product and can be modified or adapted for complexity and/or grade level. Therefore, Cycle 1 students and Cycle 3 students can be involved in creating the same product, e.g. writing a book, at very different levels of development. (See Progression of Learning Document)

Click on the links in the following table to find out more about specific projects.

Develop a solution to a community or school problem Check out the Park Project.
Write a book or comic

Digital Storytelling

If I Were Principal: Picture Book Inquiry

The Case of the Chocolate Egg

Create a public service announcement, or develop an advertising campaign Help Keep Our Parks Safe
Put together a class newspaper, do a news report Check out Creating a Classroom Newspaper at ReadWriteThink
Write or produce a play, puppet show or video Junie B. Jones
Design a new product For example younger students could design the packaging for a new cereal, older students could design plans for a new video game and make a mock-up of the DVD case.
Write poetry

The Best Part of Me

ABCity

Design a game

Students can redesign a familiar board game like Monopoly, to demonstrate what they have learned about a particular topic or concept e.g. a game based on the life of someone they have read about.

You can find a classroom example here.

Create a podcast Check out some student podcasts at Balado Web
Create a photo story

ABCity

Quebec Roots

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Process refers to the way students come to understand essential knowledge and ideas. Carol Ann Tomlinson (2004), one of the most (...)