Literacy Today Logo

Reading Strategies

 

The most rigorous reading is to find what those words on that page mean in our own lives. - Kylene Beers, Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading

 

 

Reading strategies refer to both meaning-making processes and to the reader's knowledge about the purpose and function of the structures, features, codes and conventions of different texts read in different contexts. Readers call on their reading profile, which includes familiar texts drawn from their reading experience, as well as the reading strategies that they have developed and rely upon. Students expand their reading profile and improve reading fluency by spending time reading a variety of texts and are encouraged to discover and extend the pleasures of the reading experience. In addition, it is the ability to connect the reader's stance, the relationship to the text being read, to the reading context and textual details that allows the reader to build and sustain meaning. 

 

Teachers can model the way they construct meaning through a guided exploration of a variety of texts. These strategies may be revisited frequently.

Readers call on their reading profile, which includes familiar texts drawn from their reading experience, as well as the reading strategies that they have developed and rely upon. Students expand their reading profile and improve reading fluency by spending time reading a variety of texts and are encouraged to discover and extend the pleasures of the reading experience.

 

Read Alouds 

A read-aloud is a deliberate part of teaching and is an effective way to deliver sophisticated literacy experiences to students. 

During the read-aloud the teacher can:

  • model flluent reading
  • provide an enjoyable shared reading experience
  • introduce a broad range of authors and genres
  • demonstrates strategies used by competent readers.

The read-aloud should be brief and done on a regular basis. One approach is to do a read-aloud that gives students a taste of narrative voice, writer's craft or organization of information using a short text such as a poem, short story, graphic novel or novel excerpt. 

Additional Resources

Edutopia has a collection of 11 Alternatives to Round Robin Reading that are student-centered in their approach. 

The High School Reading Teacher blog offers ideas for using fix up reading strategies with students.

The New York Times offers articles and resources for read-alouds in high school. 

The Teaching it Forward blog discusses using think alouds and provides step-by-step information. Back to top